100in100

100 record sets & millions of names in 100 days

Over the next 100 days we will be releasing and showcasing 100 record sets

We will be releasing new records every week and highlighting some of our recently added collections. From military records to parish records, births, marriages, deaths and christenings, our records offer you an even better chance to discover your ancestors. Explore exclusive records from around the world with findmypast.

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Staffordshire Parish baptisms ›

Staffordshire baptism

On completion, The Staffordshire Collection will comprise approximately 6 million fully searchable transcripts and scanned images of registers from Staffordshire parishes, spanning 1538 to 1900. This first instalment is published here online for the first time in association with Staffordshire and Stoke on Trent Archive Service.

1,273,932 baptism records from around 200 Staffordshire parishes have gone live today. A baptism record states the date and place an individual was baptised into a church. The information in each record depends on its date, but they typically list an individual’s name, religious denomination, the date and location of their baptism, and are an essential part of researching your family history.

The parents of the person baptised are often named, which can prove a crucial link to previous generations. Some of the more recent records list the date of birth, mother’s maiden name, the father’s occupation and the name of the officiating minister.

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Staffordshire Burials ›

Staff burial

The Staffordshire burials augment Findmypast’s extensive collection of parish records. The 868,062 records in this set cover 174 Staffordshire parishes and date back to 1538, nearly 300 years before the civil registration of England & Wales burials began in 1837.

Despite recording the dead, the Staffordshire burial records can reveal surprising amounts of biographical information about your ancestor such as their date of death, previous residence, their status at birth, previous occupation or rank, marital status and age at death, their religious denomination and occasionally their cause of death and the details of living relatives.

They also include details of their burial, such as the date, place and if they were buried in unconsecrated ground.

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Staffordshire Marriages ›

Staff wedding

The Staffordshire parish marriage registers contain over 638,723 records from 213 different parishes in the West Midland county. Some of the earlier records in this set contain the details of marriages that took place as early as 1538, a number of which are written in Latin.

Parish marriage registers were kept by the church and often list the parents of the bride and groom – information that is key to getting your research back another generation.

The amount of information included can vary, but the records usually contain the full names of the bride and groom, their religious denomination, their ages, home parishes and the date of their wedding. In some cases the records can also include the names of any witnesses (often family members), the names and occupations of the bride’s and groom’s parents, the occupation of the groom, the couple’s previous marital condition and the name of the officiating minister.

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Staffordshire Banns ›

Staff bann

Banns of marriage are an ancient legal tradition, where a couple’s intention to marry would be publically announced at their parish church. The reading of the banns provided an opportunity for anybody to put forward a legal or religious objection to the marriage taking place. Banns had to be read on three Sundays in the three months before the wedding, unless the couple were to be married by licence. It is important to note that banns only state an intention to marry; the posting of the banns doesn’t necessarily mean the marriage took place.

There are 87,988 banns records from 111 parishes in the Staffordshire Collection. Banns normally list the full names of the bride and groom, their places of residence, the date of banns and the date of marriage.

Some records also include the couple’s previous marital status, the name of the officiating minister and the dates of the three Sundays on which the banns were read.

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Shropshire, Kinnerley & West Felton Bishop's Transcripts, Burials 1630-1692 ›

Devon burials final

The introduction of Bishop’s transcripts in 1597 is significant to family historians as it means that two sets of records were kept of baptisms, marriages and burials. This doubles the chance that the records would survive, as gaps can often appear in Parish records due to the condition of the paper on which the records were written, where they were stored, damage caused by disintegration or water damage among many other reasons.

This set of bishop’s transcripts is a record of burials that took place in the parishes of Kinnerley & West Felton in the English county of Shropshire, also formerly known as Salop. The details in each transcript may vary but they can include the first and last name of the deceased, their residence, their home parish and the first names of their parents.

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Shropshire, Kinnerley & West Felton Bishop's Transcripts, Marriages 1630-1692 ›

Doncaster baptisms

The county of Shropshire (also known as Salop). West Felton and Kinnerley are both villages located within Shropshire. West Felton was mentioned in the Domesday Book as ‘Feltone’ and ‘Felton by le Knokyn.’ The old ecclesiastical parish contained the townships of West Felton, Sutton, Rednall, Haughton, Teddesmere, Woolston, Sandford and Twyford.

These records come from original bishop’s transcripts of marriage registers. They can include details such as the names of the bride and groom, their residence, the date of their marriage, where it took place and the bride’s marital condition.

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Shropshire, Kinnerley & West Felton Bishop's Transcripts, Baptisms 1630-1685 ›

Devon Banns

Following the establishment of the Anglican Church, the Vicar General of England, Thomas Cromwell, ordered in 1538 that all parishes were to keep records of baptisms, marriages and burials. Often these records were kept in a single book that was to be kept in a coffer, a small chest, locked by two keys. One key was held by the minister and the other by the church warden. Entries were to be made every Sunday after service and if records were not kept the church would be fined. In 1597, a constitution of the Convocation of the Province of Canterbury was approved by Elizabeth I, which required that each parish send annual reports to the bishop. These were known as bishop’s transcripts.

These records are transcripts of the original bishop’s transcripts of baptisms conducted in the Shropshire parishes of Kinnerley and West Felton. They can include a variety of details about your ancestor such as their full name, date of birth, residence, home parish, parents’ names and father’s occupation.

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Oklahoma Marriages 1842-1912 ›

Oklahoma marriages

Oklahoma is the 28th most populous and 20th most extensive of the 50 United States. During the 19th century hundreds of thousands of settlers flocked to the state to claim land in the prairies. A number of large-scale ‘land runs’, opening up previously restricted areas, were held to speed up settlement.

The 21,000 records in this set contain details of marriages that took place in the state between 1842 and 1912. They date back to the very formation of the Oklahoma Territory, and continue past Oklahoma becoming the 46th state in 1907. As the territory formed around 1890, counties were required to register marriages, so records generally begin with the creation of each county.

The records can include information such as the first and last names of the bride and groom, their dates of birth, parents’ names, and the date and location of the wedding.

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Montana Marriages 1863-1960 ›

Montana marriages

Montana is the fourth largest state in America, but comes 48th in terms of population density. Historically the region has been a centre for agriculture and ranching, as well as mining and lumber. Prior to the creation of Montana Territory (1864–1889), various parts of what is now Montana were parts of Oregon Territory (1848–1859), Washington Territory (1853–1863), Idaho Territory (1863–1864), and Dakota Territory (1861–1864). Montana became a United States territory (Montana Territory) on 26 May 1864.

The 75,000 records in this set each contain a transcript of marriages performed in the state of Montana from even before its admission to the Union in 1889.

The records can include information such as the first and last names of the bride and groom, their place of birth, parents’ names and where and when the wedding took place.

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Wyoming Marriages 1867-1941 ›

Wyoming marriages

Wyoming is the 10th most extensive, but the least populous of the 50 United States. The region acquired the name Wyoming some time prior to 1865, when Representative J M Ashley of Ohio introduced a bill to Congress to provide a “temporary government for the territory of Wyoming”. The territory was named after the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania, made famous by the 1809 poem Gertrude of Wyoming by Thomas Campbell. After the Union Pacific Railroad had reached the town of Cheyenne in 1867, the region’s population began to grow steadily, and the federal government formally established the Wyoming Territory on 25 July 1868.

These 27,000 records contain the details of many early pioneers, who settled out west. Although state-wide registration of marriages did not begin until 1941, many counties recorded this information from shortly after the county was established.

The records can include information such as the first and last names of the bride and groom, parents’ names and where and when the wedding took place.

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Sheffield, Norton Cemetery Burials 1869 – 1995 ›

irish death notices

Burial in Europe was under the control of the Church from around the 7th century and could only be carried out on consecrated church ground. From the early 19th century however, the burial of the dead in graveyards (burial grounds within churchyards) began to fall out of favour. This was due to rapid population growth in the early stages of the Industrial Revolution, continued outbreaks of infectious disease near graveyards, and the increasingly restricted space in graveyards for new interment. Entirely new burial places were established far from heavily populated areas at the outskirts of towns and cities. Many new cemeteries were municipally owned and therefore independent from churches.

Norton Cemetery is one of 16 cemeteries in Sheffield. It was originally owned by Norton Parish Council and is today run by Sheffield City Council. The cemetery, covering six acres and offering views of the Sheaf valley and the moors, contains 27 graves of service members killed in World War 1 and seven from World War 2.

The 19,902 records in this set contain the details of Sheffield residents buried in the cemetery over a period of 126 years. Each record contains a transcript of the original register entry. The amount of information listed varies, but the registers can reveal your ancestor’s year of birth, place and date of burial, home county, age at death and previous address.

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Warwickshire, Witton Cemetery Memorial Index 1881 – 1898 ›

Funeral for victims of the First World War

Warwickshire is a county in the West Midlands region of England. Warwickshire is divided into five districts: North Warwickshire, Nuneaton & Bedworth, Rugby, Warwick, and Stratford-on-Avon, which is famous for being the birthplace of playwright William Shakespeare. In addition, the historic county boundaries included Coventry, Solihull and much of Birmingham.

As the population of urban areas dramatically rose following the Industrial Revolution, safely disposing of the dead in urban areas became a cause of great concern. The Metropolitan Burial Act of 1852 legislated for the establishment of the first national system of government-funded municipal cemeteries across Britain, paving the way for an enormous expansion of burial facilities throughout the 19th century. Urban burial grounds were viewed as public open spaces and were thus professionally designed to be attractive places to visit in their own right.

The 93,527 records in this set contain the details of men, women and children buried in Witton Cemetery between 1881 and 1898. Originally called Birmingham City Cemetery, Witton Cemetery opened in 1863 and is still the largest cemetery in Birmingham. It is 103 acres in size and is laid out like an open park. Each record contains a transcript of the original register entry. The amount of information listed varies, but the registers can reveal your ancestor’s full name, year of death, home county and date of burial.

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New England Naturalizations, 1791-1906 ›

Naturalization is the legal act or process by which a non-citizen in a country may acquire citizenship or nationality of that country. The New England Naturalizations 1791-1906 were filed at various courts throughout the six states of New England: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. These northeastern states have been popular destinations for immigration and settlement since colonial times due to the rich and expansive farmlands and large towns and cities such Boston, Providence and Hartford.

The 635,867 records in this collection contain a variety of applicant details such as name, address, country and date of birth, date and place of arrival in the U.S., date of naturalization, the names and addresses of any witnesses, and the certificate number and the title and location of the court.

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US Newspaper update ›

US newspapers

Our latest U.S. newspaper update adds millions more pages to our collection. These additions cover all 50 states and range in date from the colonial era to the present. Use the articles you find to place an ancestor in an exact location on a specific date or to learn more historical events they lived through.

Some highlights from the update include, 1 million pages added to Pennsylvania newspapers, 250,000 pages added to Massachusetts newspapers, and over 700,000 pages added to the Ohio newspaper collections.

New discoveries are waiting for you to uncover in these recently added newspapers. Learn specific details about your ancestors in obituaries, wedding and birth notices and read about momentous world events and local news stories that will add depth to your family history research.

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1821 Kent, Dartford Census ›

Dartford 2

The 1821 Kent, Dartford census records contain the name of 613 heads of household living in 20 districts in Dartford in 1821.

The records include the first and last name of the head of household, the number of males and females in the property and which age bracket they fell into, whether employed in agriculture or trade, manufactory or handicraft, and the district and address of the household.

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1801 Kent, Dartford Census ›

Dartford

Dartford is the principal town in the Borough of Dartford in Kent. It lies 16 miles south-east of central London, on the border of Kent and Greater London. It also borders the Borough of Thurrock, Essex, via the Dartford Crossing of the River Thames.

These records comprise over 2,580 records from 20 districts in Dartford, recorded in the 1801 census. They contain the details of households such as members’ first and last names, their status (i.e. lodger, servant, marital status, pensioner, relation to head of household, or whether they were a workhouse inmate), the number of families, males, females and servants in a property, whether employed in agriculture, and the district and address of the household.

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British Royal Air Force, Airmen's Service Records 1912-1939 ›

Air 79

These records, released online for the very first time in association with The National Archives in London, reveal the hitherto hidden stories behind non-commissioned officers and airmen. These men came from over 30 countries, including 18 who were born in Germany, and formed the bulk of the Royal Air Force during World War One.

Airman is a generic term for anybody in the RAF, whether they flew or not, including ground crews and engineers. The record set comprises 342,818 records from 1912 to 1939. Record-keeping began with the inception of the RAF on 1 April 1918, however our collection also includes retrospective details of earlier service in the Royal Flying Corps or Royal Naval Air Service.

Each record contains information such as age, religious denomination, physical description, trade classification, special qualifications, awards or decorations, details of former service, will particulars, military training, details of promotions, reductions, casualties and details of injuries attained during service. Next of kin are also often mentioned, and this too has been fully indexed and is easily searchable.

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British Royal Air Force, Officers' Service Records 1912-1920 ›

Air 76

The RAF is the oldest independent air force in the world, the first to become independent of army or navy control. It was formed on 1 April 1918 by merging the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS), as a response to the events of World War One. At the time, it was the largest air force in the world.

The British Royal Air Force, Officers’ Service Records 1912-1920 are records held at The National Archives in London and include around 101,000 records of Commonwealth Airmen. Some records include images of over 50 pages, and contain retrospective details of earlier service in the Royal Flying Corps or Royal Naval Air Service during World War One. They contain the details of an individual’s peacetime and military career, as well as a physical description, religious denomination and family status. These records contain many of the top flying aces of World War One.

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Irish Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912 ›

petty-sessions-court-18532

Petty Sessions handled the bulk of lesser criminal and civil legal proceedings. These were presided over by Justices of the Peace, who were unpaid and often lacked any formal legal training. Justices were usually prominent landowners or gentlemen. Justice was pronounced summarily at these courts – i.e. without a jury. Petty Sessions sat daily, weekly or monthly, depending on the volume of cases, and often saw controversial judgements. Every court had a clerk, whose job it was to record the details of each case in the registers.

There are now over 20 million records in the Irish Petty Sessions records. These include details of victims, witnesses and the accused, such as address, date in court, details of the offence, details of the verdict and the sentence.

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Ireland Dog Licence Registers ›

dogs

Dog licences were introduced in Ireland in 1865 to make it easier for the authorities to identify the owners of troublemaking dogs that either worried sheep or damaged property. It cost two shillings per dog, plus sixpence in administration costs. The licences were issued in the same courts that held the Petty Sessions. In the first year, 353,798 dog licences were issued generating over £35,000 in revenue. Subsequent years saw an average of 250,000 licences purchased. In the following decades, millions more licences were issued.

Now with over 2.4 million records in the collection, the Irish Dog Licences contain not only the name, breed, colour and sex of your ancestor’s four legged friend, but also the owner’s address and the date the licence was issued.

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British Army Honourable Artillery Company 1848-1922 ›

HAC

The Honourable Artillery Company was incorporated by Royal Charter in 1537 by King Henry VIII and is the second oldest military organisation in the world. Today it is a registered charity whose purpose is to attend to the “better defence of the realm”. Regiments, battalions and batteries of the Company have fought with distinction in the Second Boer War and both world wars. Its current regiment, which forms part of the British Army Reserve, is the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior in the Army Reserve.

These records, many scanned in colour and released online for the first time exclusively by findmypast, span the years 1848 to 1922. They contain the details of around 13,000 men who served with the Company. The amount of information listed differs according to the battalion, but the records can include information about a soldier’s rank and service history, year of admission and other biographical information. Some of the records even include photographs and revealing letters from next of kin or the soldiers themselves.

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South Australia passenger lists 1847-1886 ›

South Aus Pass

From the mid-1830s until roughly 1860, assisted emigration was administered in London and funded by the sale of crown land in the newly-founded colony of South Australia. In 1858, South Australia gained its own representative government and took over the administration of the land fund, becoming the first colony in Australia to send its own immigration agent to London to manage both the fund and the arrangement of transport for the assisted passenger schemes.

The 221,090 records in this collection were compiled from original passenger lists, as well as mentions of ship arrivals in the South Australian Government Gazette, Sydney Shipping Gazette and South Australian Register. The collection contains details such as name, age, occupation, marital status and country of origin.

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World War I Draft Registration Cards ›

babe ruth for ww1 draft cards

Findmypast’s huge collection of World War One draft cards now totals over 19 million cards following our latest update. Each card offers a wealth of information about your ancestors’ lives at the tumultuous beginning of the 20th century.

From 1917, more than 24 million Americans, nearly 98 per cent of the population under the age of 46, registered for the draft. This nationwide collection represents 25 per cent of the entire U.S. population, and includes detailed personal information about each individual.

The World War One draft registration cards contain details including occupation, origin city, a physical description and information on close relatives. Each draft registration card is also individually signed, offering a rare glimpse at an ancestor’s handwriting.

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Wales, Pontypool Workhouse Deaths 1869-1894 ›

Pontypool

The 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act established Poor Law Unions, a move away from the parish based system of poor relief that had been in place since the 17th century.

The Unions were to administer workhouses for the local poor. Workhouses were supposed to be a deterrent to the able-bodied pauper. Under the Act, poor relief would only be granted to those who passed the “workhouse test”, in other words you would have to be desperate to enter a workhouse.

Pontypool Poor Law Union was formed on 23rd May 1836. Its operation was overseen by an elected Board of Guardians, which consisted of 26 men representing its 22 constituent parishes. The 797 records in this set each contain a transcription of the original workhouse death register. This includes information such as the deceased pauper’s name, age, year of birth, date of death and burial, their parish, poor law union and place of burial.

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Yorkshire, Leeds, Burials 1895-1921 ›

Doncaster burials

Holbeck Cemetery opened in 1857, and was the third municipal cemetery to open in Leeds after the 1853 Burial Act. The Act allowed the establishment of publicly funded cemeteries throughout England to ease the pressure on parish churchyards. The cemetery covers 10 acres overlookingLeeds. It cost £7,000 to build and is a typical Victorian cemetery. It was closed to general burials in the 1940s.

Holbeck is a suburb of Leeds in the West Riding of Yorkshire in the north of England. These records list the details of 10,269 men and women buried there between 1895 and 1921, and contain information such as their name, year of birth, year of death, date of burial, age at death, their parish, residence and grave plot number.

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Yorkshire, Leeds, Cremations 1938-1969 ›

irish death notices

Yorkshire, Leeds, cremations 1938-1969 Cremation was not legal in Britain until 1885, though the population of towns and cities exploded during the Industrial Revolution, making the disposal of human remains a serious concern. In the Vienna Exposition of 1873, Queen Victoria’s physician Sir Henry Thompson saw a model of an Italian cremation apparatus and became a passionate advocate of cremation. Sir Henry saw cremation as a more sanitary alternative which would prevent premature burial, reduce the expense of funerals, and spare mourners from unnecessary exposure to the elements during interment. Also, urns would be safe from vandalism.

These records contain the details of 25,042 men and women cremated at the Cottingley Hall crematorium in Leeds, from just after it opened in 1937 until 1969. They include information such as name, age, year of birth, date of death, as well as the place and date of their cremation.

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PERSI Monthly Image Update ›

PERSI image update

PERSI (the PERiodical Source Index) is the world’s largest and most widely used subject index for U.S. genealogy and local history literature. Over the past thirty years, the Allen County Public Library (ACPL) Genealogy Centre has created more than 2.5 million searchable records in PERSI, indexing every article from more than 8,000 different periodicals. These include magazines, newsletters and journals, according to location, topic, surname, ethnicity and methodology.

This latest release includes images of the original periodicals, which findmypast has matched to the index as part of our promise to launch the most complete version of PERSI online. The new periodicals are comprised of issues from ten different publications covering a period between 1825 and 1921.

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England & Wales Non-Conformist Burials ›

RG4 burials

Non-conformist is a very broad term, covering churches that did not follow the teachings of the Church of England. The phrase can be used to describe Roman Catholics, Jews, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, members of the Society of Friends, and English Protestants who did not follow the established Anglican Church.

Before civil registration was introduced in 1837, most people were baptised, married and buried in their local C of E parish, regardless of their beliefs. Some however kept their own registers, particularly after the Toleration Act of 1689.

This collection contains 603,680 records of burials between 1640 and 1898. These come from the Presbyterian, Baptist and Independent churches, the Wesleyan Methodist Metropolitan registry and the extensive collection of Non-conformist records in the Dr Williams’ Library in London.
There are also records from the Royal Hospital in Chelsea and the Royal Hospital Greenwich, as well as burials in locations such as Hackney, Walworth, and Liverpool.

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England & Wales Non-Conformist Baptisms ›

RG4 Baptisms

Non-conformist is a very broad term, covering churches that did not follow the teachings of the Church of England. The phrase can be used to describe Roman Catholics, Jews, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, members of the Society of Friends, and English Protestants who did not follow the established Anglican Church.

Before civil registration was introduced in 1837, most people were baptised, married and buried in their local C of E parish, regardless of their beliefs. Some however kept their own registers, particularly after the Toleration Act of 1689.

This collection contains 1,373,168 records of baptisms between 1778 and 1899. These come from Congregational Church records covering the Presbyterian, Baptist and Independent churches, the extensive Non-conformist archive held at Dr William’s Library in London and the Wesleyan Methodist Metropolitan Registry.

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England & Wales Non-Conformist Marriages ›

RG4 marriages

Non-conformist is a very broad term, covering churches that did not follow the teachings of the Church of England. The phrase can be used to describe Roman Catholics, Jews, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, members of the Society of Friends, and English Protestants who did not follow the established Anglican Church.

Before civil registration was introduced in 1837, most people were baptised, married and buried in their local C of E parish, regardless of their beliefs. Some however kept their own registers, particularly after the Toleration Act of 1689.

Between 1754 and 1837 it was illegal to marry anywhere except in a Church of England parish church, unless you were a member of the Society of Friends (Quakers) or Jewish. In both cases members were exempt from the Act and allowed to keep their own records.

This collection contains 5,289 records of marriages between 1641 and 1852. These come from the Presbyterian, Baptist and Independent churches, the Wesleyan Methodist Metropolitan registry and the extensive collection of Non-conformist records in the Dr Williams’ Library in London.

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Britain, School and University Register Books 1264-1930 ›

British schools

This collection is comprised of approximately 185,000 images taken from 460 volumes of UK school and university registers. These have been compiled by the Anguline Research Archives, an organisation dedicated to providing digital resources for family historians, local historians and social historians.

Taken from 41 different institutions, these records contain the details of an estimated one million pupils, students and staff between the years 1264 and 1930.

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Lincolnshire Poor Law Removals 1665-1865 ›

surrey quarter

The Poor Laws were a system of poor relief which existed in England and Wales until the emergence of the modern welfare state after the Second World War. The 1601 Poor Law Act empowered overseers, appointed in parishes across the country, to collect a poor rate, or tax, from wealthier members of the parish and distribute the funds among residents in need. Because responsibility for destitute residents fell to the parish itself, authorities kept close tabs on who had a right to claim the parish as a legal place of settlement. People who could not legally claim the right of settlement and were deemed “likely to be chargeable” to the parish poor rates, could be sent back or “removed,” to their last legal parish of settlement.

The 4,909 records in this collection contain the details of individuals removed from the county of Lincolnshire under the 1662 Poor Law Relief Act between 1665 and 1865. The level of detail varies, but the records can include information such as name, parish, age, name of spouse, names of children, where removed to and from, plus occasional details about their circumstances.

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Epsom College England Deaths 1899-1945 ›

Epsom college

Epsom College is a school in the town of Epsom in Surrey, in Southern England, for pupils aged 13 to 18. The school was founded in 1853 by Dr. John Propert as The Royal Medical Benevolent College, the aims of which were to provide accommodation for pensioned medical doctors or their widows in the first instance, and a “liberal education” to 100 sons of “duly qualified medical men” for £25 each year.

Epsom College England Deaths 1899-1945 consists of 650 records containing the details of former pupils who were killed while serving in the military between 1899 and 1945. Each record is an original transcript. The records can contain information such as first and last name, birth year, place of service, residence, next of kin, date and place of death, service number, rank, regiment, battalion and burial details.

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Bromsgrove School England Deaths 1899-1945 ›

Bromsgrove school

Bromsgrove School was established in 1553 in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England. It was originally recorded in 1476 as a chantry school, and became a Tudor grammar school between 1548 and 1553. Sir Thomas Cookes’ financial endowment funded the first buildings on the present site in 1693. During the Second World War, the school was temporarily relocated to Llanwrtyd Wells in Wales, and its buildings were used by British government departments.

The 195 records in our collection contain the details of former pupils who were killed during military service between 1899 and 1945. Each record is an original transcript. The records can contain information such as first and last name, birth year, place of service, residence, next of kin, date and place of death, service number, rank, regiment, and battalion and burial details.

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Wyggeston Grammar School England Deaths 1939-1945  ›

Wyggerston grammar school

Following the death of Leicestershire wool merchant William Wyggeston in 1536, his brother Thomas (a trustee) used some of William’s money to establish a grammar school in Leicester. This later became Wyggeston Grammar School for Boys, known today as Wyggeston and Queen Elizabeth I College.

The 136 records in our collection contain the details of former pupils who were killed in the Second World War. Each record is an original transcript. The records can contain information such as first and last name, birth year, residence, next of kin, date and place of death, service number, rank, regiment, battalion, and burial details.

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1890 U.S. Census, Civil War Union Veterans and Widows ›

1890 civil war

Twenty-five years after the end of the U.S. Civil War, the federal government issued an additional schedule, or form, as part of the regular 1890 U.S. Census to be completed by all members of the Union armed forces who had served in the war. These new schedules requested all of the information necessary to summarize a veteran’s service, including their unit information, length of service, and any lasting disability suffered from the war. If the veteran did not survive to complete the form, their widow was instructed to provide as much information as possible.

The 1890 US Census Civil War Union Veterans and Widows contain over 887,000 records. The amount of information listed may vary, but the records can include the first and last name of a soldier, their rank, company and regiment, their length of service, any disability incurred, their NARA publication number and the first and last name of their surviving widow.

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British Casualties, Korean War 1950-1953 ›

British casualties - korean

After World War 2 Korea, which had been annexed by Japan in 1910, was divided into two parts. The move was intended to be short term, pending a return to Korean independence. Soviet Russia would take control of north of the 38th parallel, while the south would be under American military administration. Russia backed a Stalinist regime in the north under Kim Il-sung and created the North Korean People’s Army, equipped with Russian tanks and artillery. In the south the political situation was chaotic. This resulted in an American-backed administration under President Syngman Rhee, who was determined to bring about national unity by force. The tensions between north and south built until, on 25 June 1950, the North Korean People’s Army launched an invasion of the south. In response the UN sent a mainly American force to help. 100,000 British service personnel were involved in the Korean War with over 1,000 killed.

The records in our collection cover 4,502 service personnel, who were killed or injured between 1950 and 1953. They include details such as a soldier’s name, place of birth, service number, rank, regiment, whether they were killed or injured, where and where it happened, and details of their burial.

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British Casualties, Aden 1955-1967 ›

British casualties - aden

The Aden Emergency was an insurgency against the British forces in the British controlled territories of South Arabia which now form part of the Yemen. Partly inspired by Gamal Abdel Nasser pan Arab nationalism, it began on 10 December 1963 when a grenade was thrown at a gathering of British officials at Aden Airport. A state of emergency was then declared in the British Crown colony of Aden and the Aden Protectorate. The emergency escalated in 1967, hastening the end of British rule in the territory, which had begun in 1839. On 30 November 1967, British forces withdrew and the independent People’s Republic of South Yemen was proclaimed.

The Aden conflict began in 1963. Our collection covers British deaths prior to the official date, and includes the details of over 200 casualties. The records can include information such as a person’s name, service number, rank, age, date and place of birth, battalion and regiment, awards, family details, residence, as well as details of their death and burial.

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Dorset Burials ›

Funeral for victims of the First World War

The Dorset burial registers cover burials for most parishes in the county of Dorset, and contain over 185,197 records.

Before 1837 there was no civil registration of deaths, so all deaths were registered in the local parish. These parish registers date back to 1538.

Covering 450 years of Dorset history, the records can include useful biographical information such as the full name of the deceased, the date of their death and burial, their age at death, their place of residence and religious denomination.

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Dorset Marriages ›

Wedding party, Tasmania

The Dorset parish marriages are marriage records made and kept by the Church. We now have 225, 411 marriage records from parishes across the county covering the years 1538 to 1952. Many list the parents of the bride and groom, which can be crucial to discovering information about the previous generation.

The level of detail can vary, but the records usually contain the full names of the bride and groom, their ages, their home parishes and the date of their wedding.

Some later records include the names of witnesses (often family members), the names and occupations of the bride’s and groom’s parents, the occupation of the groom, and the couple’s previous marital condition.

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Dorset Baptisms ›

Going to Church

Dorset lies in South West England on the English Channel coast. It covers an area of 1,024 square miles and borders Devon to the west, Somerset to the north-west, Wiltshire to the north-east, and Hampshire to the east.

The Dorset baptism registers record the details of baptisms that took place in parish churches across the county. Before 1837 there was no civil registration of births, so all births were registered in the local parish. The 323,120 baptism records contained within this collection date as far back as 1538.

The amount of information listed varies, but baptism registers tend to list an individual’s name, year of birth, date and parish of baptism, as well as their parents’ names, occupations and residence. Baptism records are of valuable assistance in uncovering the details of a previous generation.

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British Royal Navy Personnel 1831 ›

British Royal Navy

British Royal Navy personnel 1831 records give a snapshot of the Royal Navy in that year using ships’ muster books, naval dockyard musters, hospital registers, Royal Marine shore lists and Navy lists. The records detail 66,125 men, and were extracted from ships’ muster books covering 228 vessels, hospitals, bases or musters.

Ships’ musters provide details on when a man entered a ship, his age, his rank, place of birth, and details of discharge prior to April 1831. Commissioned officers and those travelling as passengers do not have their place of birth recorded. Hospital musters include much of the same information, with additional information gathered from hospital pay lists, dockyard lists and Royal Marine shore lists.

The original records also give the location of the ship in April 1831, and some additional notes.

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Berkshire burials ›

Wyggerston grammar school

We have added to our existing collection of Berkshire burials on findmypast, which now total 750,669 burials. These new records have been added in partnership with Berkshire family history Society and detail burials that took place in the 175 parish churches in the county between 1536 and 1962.

The records can include useful biographical information such as the full name of the deceased, the date of their death and burial, their age at death, their place of residence, religious denomination, and their spouse’s first name, father’s first name and mother’s first name.

We have added to our existing collection of Berkshire burials on findmypast, which now total 750,669 burials. These new records have been added in partnership with Berkshire family history Society and detail burials that took place in the 175 parish churches in the county between 1536 and 1962.

The records can include useful biographical information such as the full name of the deceased, the date of their death and burial, their age at death, their place of residence, religious denomination, and their spouse’s first name, father’s first name and mother’s first name.

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Berkshire Marriages ›

Shrops Marriages

The Berkshire parish marriages are marriage records made and kept by the Church. We now have 228,516 marriage records from around 89 parishes in the Berkshire family history society records covering the years 1538 to 1927. Many list the parents of the bride and groom, which can be crucial to discovering information about the previous generation.

The level of detail can vary, but the records usually contain the full names of the bride and groom, their ages, their home parishes and the date of their wedding.

Some later records include the names of witnesses (often family members), the names and occupations of the bride’s and groom’s parents, the occupation of the groom, and the couple’s previous marital condition. These records are published online for the first time in association with Berkshire Family History Society

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Devon Burials ›

Devon burials final

The Devon burial registers cover burials for most of the Anglican parishes in the English county of Devon and contain over a million records. Those in the Plymouth and West Devon area are already available separately on findmypast in partnership with the record office there.

Before 1837 there was no civil registration of deaths, so all deaths were registered in the local parish. These parish registers date back to 1538.

Covering 375 years of Devonshire history, the records can include useful biographical information such as the full name of the deceased, the date of their death and burial, their age at death, their place of residence and religious denomination.

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Devon Baptisms ›

Devon Baptisms

Devon is a maritime county in the south west of England. It is bordered by Cornwall on the west, with Dorset and Somerset to the east. There is evidence that the county has been inhabited since Stone Age times.

The Devon Baptism Registers cover baptisms for most of the Anglican parishes in the county except for those in the Plymouth and West Devon area, which are already available separately on findmypast in partnership with the record office there. Before 1837 there was no civil registration of births, so all births were registered in the local parish. The 1.5 million records contained within the baptism registers date as far back as 1538.

The amount of information listed varies, but baptism registers tend to list an individual’s name, year of birth, date and parish of baptism, as well as their parents’ names, occupations and residence. Baptism records are of valuable assistance in uncovering the details of a previous generation.

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Devon Banns Registers 1538-1915 ›

Devon Banns

Banns of marriage were the announcement in church of a couple’s intention to marry. They are an ancient legal tradition designed to provide an opportunity for anybody to state a reason why the marriage could not lawfully take place. Banns were read in the parish or parishes in which the couple lived and in the parish where they were to marry, on three Sundays in the three months before the wedding took place.

There are 202,000 records of banns in the Devon Collection. They tend to list the full names of the bride and groom, their places of residence, the date of banns, and the date of their marriage. In some later records there are also details of couple’s previous marital status, and the dates of the three Sundays on which the banns were published.

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Devon Marriages ›

Devon Marriages

The Devon marriage registers were made and kept by the Church. There are over 1.5 million marriage records in the Devon registers, many of which list the parents of the bride and groom. These details are often the key to discovering names for the previous generation.

The amount of information included can vary, but the records usually contain the full names of the bride and groom, their ages, their home parishes and the date of their wedding. Some later records include the names of witnesses (often family members), the names and occupations of the bride’s and groom’s parents, the occupation of the groom, and the couple’s previous marital condition.

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New Zealand Lands & Surveys Department Nominal Roll of Officers 1901 ›

Cheshire Land Tax

The Department of Lands and Survey was established in 1876. It was originally responsible for many different spheres, including Crown lands and roads, surveys, forests and agriculture, and even immigration and health, and tourist resorts. In subsequent years, other departments took over some of these responsibilities.

The New Zealand Lands & Surveys Department Nominal Roll is an index of 269 staff members employed by New Zealand’s Lands and Survey department in 1901. The information was sourced from a report to the New Zealand House of Representatives concerning these workers’ details of employment, including length of service and pay rates. ‘Officers’ was simply another term for ‘staff’, and the Lands and Survey Department employed a wide range of workers, including surveyors and assistant surveyors, draughtsmen, lithographers, rangers, clerks, auditors, cadets (both male and female), and more.

The amount of information listed varies, but a record can include the officer’s name, department, where they were stationed, the length of their service and rate of pay, as well as any other comments and details of their employment.

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New Zealand Electoral Rolls 1925 ›

new zealand electoral

Electoral rolls were compiled during general and provincial election years. They listed the names of individuals from each electoral district who were qualified to vote. Everyone eligible to vote was required to register on the electoral roll by law, even if they did not intend to exercise that right. The rolls can act as valuable census substitutes, particularly in countries like New Zealand where census records are not always available.

The 774,758 records in the New Zealand Electoral Roll collection allow you to pinpoint the location of your ancestor in 1925, and lists their address and occupation.

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Cheshire Land Tax Assessments 1786 – 1832 ›

Cheshire Land Tax

Land Tax started in England in 1692. The land tax assessments were administered by the Court of Quarter Sessions. These were local courts usually held in the county’s town or seat, which in Cheshire’s case was Chester.

After 1780, the Land Tax Assessments were also used by the Clerks of the Peace as voter registration for parliamentary elections. Only those responsible for the property were listed, so not everyone in the town was recorded. Often poorer sub-tenants or labourers were not listed on the assessments.

The Cheshire Land Tax Assessments contain over two million records from about 450 towns. The majority of the records cover the years 1786-1832, but there are some earlier records dating as far back as 1700 and some more recent records dating to 1908 included. The amount of information varies, but the records typically list the property owner, the name of the occupier, and the amount of tax money collected for that year. The Land Tax Assessments are a key resource in terms of pinpointing an ancestor’s location, and forming a picture of their social standing.

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Berkshire Baptisms 1538 - 1928 ›

Berkshire captisms

144,030 new baptism records from Berkshire Family History Society have been added to findmypast. Our Berkshire records contain the details of baptisms conducted across 43 parishes between 1538 and 1928.

Baptism records state the date and place an individual was baptised into a church, and are a valuable resource for extending your family tree back before the civil registration of births was introduced in 1837. The information in each record depends on its date, but they typically list an individual’s name, the date and location of their baptism.

The parents of the person baptised are often named, which can prove a crucial link to the previous generation. Some later records list date of birth, mother’s maiden name and the father’s occupation.

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The Daily Mirror 1915 ›

Daily Mirror front page

The Daily Mirror is the first national publication to be included in the British Newspaper collection on findmypast.

The paper was launched in 1903 by Alfred Harmsworth, the 1st Viscount Northcliffe, as a newspaper for women, run by women. It was not an immediate success, and in 1904 Harmsworth decided to turn it into a pictorial newspaper with a broader focus. He appointed a new editor, all of the Mirror’s female journalists were fired, the price was dropped to one halfpenny, and “A paper for men and women” was added to the masthead. The paper’s fortunes improved, and the Daily Mirror has remained a popular daily tabloid ever since.

Covering 1915, a significant year in world history, the Daily Mirror will prove particularly fascinating for anyone researching ancestors in the First World War. Historic newspapers can provide valuable and highly detailed information about your family and their local area, in addition to wider historical context, and the Daily Mirror was among the first to send photographers to the Front.

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British Casualties, Indian Mutiny 1857-1859 ›

Indian mutiny

The Indian Rebellion of 1857 began as a mutiny of Indian soldiers of the East India Company’s army on 10 May 1857. It spread rapidly as further mutinies and civilian rebellions sprung up across the country.

The conflict was a major threat to British influence in the region and signified the end of the East India Company’s authority in India. Over 2000 British soldiers and as many civilians were killed in the uprising. The Empire’s response was swift and brutal, leaving hundreds of thousands of Indian soldiers and civilians dead at the hands of British forces.

The 2,392 records in this collection contain the details of Britons killed in the mutiny. They list information such as the deceased’s place of service, home address, date of death, cause of death and former military service.

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British Casualties, Spanish Civil War 1936-1939 ›

Spanish civil war

The Spanish Civil War was fought from 17 July 1936 to 1 April 1939 between the Republicans, who were loyal to the democratically elected Spanish Republic, and the Nationalists, a rebel group led by General Francisco Franco. The Nationalists prevailed, and Franco ruled Spain for the next 36 years, from 1939 until his death in 1975.

One of the most famous aspects of the conflict was the number of foreign volunteers who took part in the fighting. Despite Britain’s neutrality and the government making it illegal to volunteer in Spain, over 4000 Britons fought on behalf of the Spanish Republicans.

These records list 540 British fatalities on the Spanish Civil War 1936-1939 register. They include the deceased’s name, place of service, home address, place and cause of death and occupation.

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Irish Marriage Notices In American Newspapers ›

irish marriage notices

Irish marriage notices in American newspapers record the marriage announcements of Irish men and women around the world, including America, England, Ireland and Australia, between the years 1835 and 1860. They are taken from four New York newspapers, the New York Herald, The Brooklyn Eagle, New York World and Phoenix, and include 2,500 records from almost three decades before civil registrations of Irish marriages in 1864.

The amount of information listed varies, but the Irish Marriages in American Newspapers usually include the names of the bride and groom, their date and place of marriage, the publication date and title, the birthplaces of the bride and groom, their parents’ names, and the name of the officiating minister.

Each wedding notice was written by a member of the bride’s or groom’s family, and printed at their expense.

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Irish Death Notices In American Newspapers ›

irish death notices

The Irish death notices in American newspapers announced the deaths of Irish men and women who died between the years 1845 and 1909. They are taken from a number of publications, and also list the deaths of Irish people who died outside of the United States.

Each record includes a transcript of a death notice taken from an American newspaper. These usually include information such as the deceased’s name, the date, place and cause of death, the publication title, the place and parish of burial, the spouse’s name, parents’ and relatives’ names, age at death, and occupation.

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Doncaster Baptisms ›

Doncaster baptisms

122,434 new baptism records from Doncaster family history society have been added to findmypast. Our Doncaster baptism records now contain the details of 303,522 baptisms conducted between 1538 and 1986 by parish churches in the Doncaster area of Yorkshire.

Baptism records state the date and place an individual was baptised into a church, and are a valuable resource for expanding your family tree back before the civil registration of births was introduced in 1837. The information in each record depends on its date, but they typically list an individual’s name, the date and location of their baptism.

The parents of the person baptised are often named, which can prove a crucial link to the previous generation. Some later records list date of birth, mother’s maiden name and the father’s occupation.

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Doncaster Burials ›

Doncaster burials

We have added 27,000 more Doncaster burials to findmypast’s extensive parish record collection. These new records have been added to existing burial records from Doncaster family history society on findmypast, making a total of 355,000 burials that took place in churches in the Doncaster area of Yorkshire between 1538 and 1986.

The records can include useful biographical information such as the full name of the deceased, the date of their death and burial, their age at death, their place of residence, religious denomination, and their spouse’s first name, father’s first name and mother’s first name.

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Surrey Quarter Sessions 1780-1820 ›

surrey quarter

The Surrey Quarter Sessions 1780 – 1820 contain more than 47,000 records of non-capital crimes that went to trial in the county.

Non-capital offences were those that did not carry the death penalty. The sessions were presided over by magistrates, otherwise known as justices of the peace. Magistrates could listen to evidence, send a case to trial and pass sentence. They also administered summary justice without a jury outside the quarter sessions. Justice was swift at the time, with the majority of trials lasting less than a day. The defendant rarely had a defence barrister.

The amount of information within each record varies. The majority include the place and date of the crime, the name, aliases, and occupation of the accused, details of their offence, and the verdict and sentence passed. Details of any witnesses, victims and accusers present at the trial are often featured also.

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British Red Cross Register of Overseas Volunteers, 1914-1918 ›

4398829756_32f1dd1206_b

The British Red Cross Register of Overseas Volunteers contains the details of over 17,000 individuals who served overseas with the British Red Cross during World War 1.

At the start of the war, the British Red Cross joined forces with the Order of St. John Ambulance to create the Joint War Committee to assist with medical care in the field. The register includes men and women who worked with the Voluntary Aid Detachments, Scottish Women’s Hospital, Order of St. John and many more. Women played a significant role during World War 1 through their involvement with these voluntary organisations and evidence of this can be viewed in the records.

Though the level of detail can vary, the register tends to list each volunteer’s name, title, rank, certificate number, department, destination – where stationed overseas – and passport number.

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British Army Service Records 1914-1920  ›

British soldiers in trench on the Western Front, WW1

Service records (WO 363)

During an air raid in September 1940, a German incendiary bomb landed on the War Office Record Store in Arnside Street, London. The subsequent fire swept through the record stores and devastated approximately two thirds of the 6.5 million soldiers’ documents covering World War 1. The majority of the surviving records were badly damaged. They became known as the ‘Burnt Documents’.

Pension records (WO 364)

These cover non-commissioned officers and other ranks who were discharged from the army and claimed disability pensions for war service between 1914 and 1920. They were in the custody of the Ministry of Pensions during the Second World War, thus escaping the Arnside Street bombing.

WO 363 and WO 364

Whilst examining the 35 million images in these two series, we identified lists of soldiers tucked away within individual service papers and indexed these as well, adding a further 584,000 names. Findmypast now offers the most complete and the most accurate index of these records.

Each record comprises a transcript, plus between one and 100 black and white images per individual. A record typically includes information such as birthplace, appearance, service details, and correspondence in some cases. The WO 363 series also includes deceased servicemen, plus details of surviving family in some cases.

WO 363 and WO 364 provide a fascinating insight into the lives of men who served in the ranks of the British Army during the First World War. You can also find service records of men who fought in the Boer War, and earlier still.

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New York City Death Notices, 1835-1880 ›

Funeral for victims of the First World War

As with marriages, many US jurisdictions did not keep death records as we know them today. This means newspaper notices are often the best way of searching for deaths that occurred before 1900.

These records contain 258,578 indexed death notices from The Brooklyn Eagle, The New York Herald and The New York World. The amount of information listed can vary, but records usually cover details such as the newspaper date and title, the deceased’s first and last name, date and place of death, year and place of birth, age at death, spouse’s name and parents’ names.

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New York City Marriage Notices 1835-1880 ›

Wedding party, Tasmania

Many US jurisdictions did not keep vital records as we know them today. If they did, these were incomplete until the early 20th century. As a substitute, genealogists have searched old bibles, US census records, and newspaper marriage notices.

By indexing the marriage notices of three major New York newspapers, The Brooklyn Eagle, The New York Herald and The New York World, findmypast is now able to provide searchable records of marriages that took place in the city between 1835 and 1880.

This collection includes nearly 125,000 marriages reported in newspapers throughout New York City. The contents vary, but records often include the date of the newspaper, marriage, names of the minister and groom, residence of the groom, name of the groom’s parents, place of marriage, name and residence of the bride, and the bride’s parents.

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New Zealand Prisoners Pardoned 1860-1862 ›

Post-war era - released war prisoners

The 182 records in this collection contain the details of prisoners who were pardoned by the New Zealand government.

They document when each prisoner’s sentence was due to expire, the date of their pardon, and the original term of their sentence.

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New Zealand Pensions Granted 1868 ›

Old Man at a book stand - Manchester, 1960

The 181 records in this collection detail pensions and allowances paid by the colonial government in 1868. They list the sum paid, the reason for payment, and the government act under which the payment was made.

The records were compiled to report back to the House of Representatives the names of those applying for pensions, and the reasons for granting them.

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New Zealand Return Of Officers In Provincial Governments 1866 ›

Office workers

The Provinces of the Colony of New Zealand existed from 1841 until 1876 as a form of sub-national government. Each province had its own legislature and was built around the six original planned settlements, or ‘colonies’. They were replaced by counties, which in turn were replaced by districts.

The 487 records in this collection contain details of the officers employed by various provincial governments in New Zealand in 1866. They contain details of their employment with various provincial governments in New Zealand, including their job title, date of appointment and salary details.

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New Zealand Civil Establishment Nominal Roll 1871 ›

Office workers

The New Zealand Civil Establishment Nominal Roll 1871 is an index of roughly 2,120 staff who worked for the New Zealand government as of 1 July 1871. It covers a vast range of different occupations, including clerks, postmasters, crown solicitors, registrars, paymasters, draughtsmen, coroners, telegraphists and many more.

The records include details such as years of service, title, salary, the office by which they were employed, and any other comments.

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New Zealand Railway Employees 1896 ›

An old fashioned steam train and workers

The first New Zealand railways were created by Provincial Governments in the 1860s. The real development of railways – as both a government department and a means of transport – began in the 1870s as a key element in Julien Vogel’s schemes for progress. Many of those who worked on the railways arrived in the country during the immigration boom of the 1870s.

The 4,496 records in this collection were compiled as a means of reporting employee details, including length of service and pay rates, to the House of Representatives. The records list the details of workers’ employment with the Railway Department, including the department with which they were employed, their length of service, pay rate and any other comments.

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Malayan Emergency - Commonwealth Deaths 1948-1960 ›

malaysia

After World War 2, Malaya was under British colonial rule. In 1946, the British government proposed creating a Malayan Union, which resulted in widespread political unrest and the creation of the Federation of Malaya in 1948. The Federation created a union among the territories and guaranteed rights of Malayans, a move which distressed the Malayan Communist Party (MCP).

On the 18 June 1948, the military branch of the MCP, the Malayan National Liberation Army (MNLA) waged a guerrilla war against commonwealth forces that would rage for a further 12 years. The Commonwealth armed forces represented regiments from the British Army, New Zealand Army, Australian Army, British Indian Army, Canadian Army and the Malayan Police.

These records list the details of 1,541 commonwealth servicemen who died in the conflict. They typically contain information such as name, service number, rank and regiment, age, year of death, cause of death, awards, and details of burial.

These records have been compiled by Martin Edwards and are published by arrangement.

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Welsh Guards 1914-1918 ›

Welsh Guards in trench near Guillemont, Western Front, WW1

The Welsh Guards were created in 1915 by Royal Warrant of King George V. Earl Kitchener, the Secretary of War, was ordered to raise the regiment – whose Welsh motto ‘Cymru am Byth’ means ‘Wales Forever’.

During the Great War the Welsh Guards received 20 battle honours and one Victorian Cross. Their first battle was at Loos, France, on 27 September 1915. About 860 Welsh Guards lost their lives during the war.

These records contain 4,060 names of officers who served with the Welsh Guards, and nominal rolls of Warrant Officers and NCOs (Non-commissioned officers). The amount of detail varies, but the records usually list a soldier’s name, number, place of birth, date of joining, rank on joining, former rank and regiment, casualty record and awards.

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Palestine Conflict British Deaths 1945-1948 ›

Palestine Conflict Deaths

After World War II, multiple Jewish resistance organisations united and established the Jewish Resistance Movement. They began to coordinate armed attacks against the British military and organise the mass illegal immigration of European Jews into the Middle East as a result of British policies in Mandatory Palestine.

A pivotal moment during the Palestine Conflict was the terrorist attack on the King David Hotel on 22nd July 1946. The hotel was the British administrative headquarters of Palestine.

These records document the deaths of 891 Servicemen killed during the Palestine Conflict. They list details such as name, age, rank, regiment, place of service, awards, date and place of death, details death and details of burial.

These records have been compiled by Martin Edwards and are published by arrangement.

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Cyprus Emergency Deaths 1955 - 1960 ›

Cyprus

The Cyprus Emergency lasted from 1955-1960, after nationalist group EOKA (Ethniki Prganosis Kyprion Agoniston/the National Organisation of Cypriot Fighters) launched a violent campaign to remove the British from Cyprus in order to allow reunification with Greece. Much of the conflict occurred around the capital city of Nicosia.

Up to 25,000 troops were involved in the conflict, and 371 British servicemen lost their lives on the island. Our collection of 457 records contains information such as the deceased soldier’s name, age, place of birth, family details, military rank and unit, date, place, and cause of death.

The conflict came to a close in 1959 with the Zurich/London Agreements, which ended British rule in Cyprus. A new Republic of Cyrus was created in 1960, and the country became a member of the Commonwealth of Nations in 1961.

These records have been compiled by Martin Edwards and are published by arrangement.

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Royal Artillery Other Ranks: Casualty Cards 1939-1947 ›

The Royal Artillery core with their gun Bonnie Mary.

These casualty cards were used to record deaths between 1939 and 1946. There are around 26,000 for the Royal Artillery.

The information included on each form includes the soldier’s army number, rank, full name, age, birthplace, place and date of death, and cause of death. A second part details the soldier’s decorations, details of their parent corps or regiment, their final rank, and the theatre or country where they sustained their fatal wounds or died.

This information, published online for the first time, is a unique reference source for Royal Artillery fatalities which occurred during the Second World War.

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Royal Artillery Attestations 1883-1942 ›

Captain Dames, Royal Artillery

This collection of over 870,000 records is taken from books which were maintained by British Army regiments, intended as permanent records of a man’s enlistment

Earlier entries – up until 1929 at least – offer an extraordinary amount of detail. Information can include a soldier’s regimental number, enlistment type, full name, date and place of attestation, transfer details, pre-military background, next of kin details, campaigns, wounds, medals or rewards of any kind, discharge details, and remarks. The remarks column is of particular note as it often gives details of prior service.

The earliest attestation noted where former service is indicated dates back to 1883. These records could therefore reveal not just First World War soldiers, but men who served in the Boer War (1899-1902), and other late nineteenth century campaigns.

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Ireland Census Search Forms 1841 and 1851 ›

Irish Search Form_2

A great deal of Irish census information survived thanks to the Irish pension system. Introduced in 1909, it required all applicants to prove that they were at least 70 years old. As civil registration of births in Ireland only began in 1864, officials used the 1841 and 1851 census returns as evidence to make their claim. The information they gathered was incorporated into the pension application records.

Most of the 1841 and 1851 Irish Census Search forms contain the name of the applicant, the current address of the applicant (often care of a local official or business), the name, age and address of the applicant in the 1841 or 1851 census, the names of the applicant’s parents, and the names and ages of other family members recorded in the 1841 or 1851 census.

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Ireland Census 1821-1851 ›

Irish Census

Finding Irish ancestors is notoriously difficult, as many Irish records were destroyed in archival disasters, most notably when the Public Record Office was blown up in 1922. Now, for the first time ever, surviving Irish census records from 1821, 1831, 1841 and 1851 can be searched and viewed exclusively at findmypast, in partnership with the National Archives of Ireland.

These highly detailed records cover large parts of County Cavan, Fermanagh, Galway, Offaly (King’s), and Meath in 1821, Derry/Londonderry in 1831, Cavan in 1841, and Antrim in 1851, and contain the details of over 600,000 people. The amount of information varies depending on the census date, but many records list an individual’s name, age, occupation, townland, parish and address. Some later census forms also list whether a person could read and write, as well as their religion.

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Shropshire Burials 1538 - 1900 ›

Shrops burials

The Shropshire burials augment findmypast’s extensive parish record collection. These records contain the details of around 800,795 burials that took place in over 270 different Shropshire parishes. These records are published online for the first time in association with Shropshire Archives.

The Shropshire burials can include useful biographical information such as the full name of the deceased, the date of their death and burial, their age at death, their place of residence, religious denomination, and their spouse’s first name, father’s first name and mother’s first name.

Where possible we have calculated year of birth based on reported age at death.

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Shropshire Marriages 1538 - 1900 ›

Shrops Marriages

The Shropshire parish marriages are marriage records made and kept by the Church. There are 535,600 marriage records from around 285 parishes in the Shropshire Collection, many of which list the parents of the bride and groom. These detail are often the key to discovering names for the previous generation.

The amount of information included can vary, but the records usually contain the full names of the bride and groom, their ages, their home parishes and the date of their wedding.

Some later records include the names of witnesses (often family members), the names and occupations of the bride and groom’s parents, the occupation of the groom, and the couple’s previous marital condition. These records are published online for the first time in association with Shropshire Archives.

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Shropshire Banns 1760 – 1900 ›

Going to Church

Banns of marriage are an ancient legal tradition. They were the announcement in church of a couple’s intention to marry, and provided an opportunity for anybody to put forward a reason why the marriage could not lawfully take place. Banns had to be read in the parish or parishes in which the couple lived and in the parish they were to marry, on three Sundays in the three months before the wedding took place.

There are 42,245 banns from around 100 Anglican parishes in the Shropshire Collection. They tend to list the full names of the bride and groom, their places of residence, the date of banns, and the date of their marriage. In some later records, there are also details of couple’s previous marital status, and the dates of the three Sundays on which the banns were published.

These records are published online for the first time in association with Shropshire Archives.

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Shropshire Baptisms 1538 – 1900 ›

Shrops baptisms

The Shropshire Collection comprises approximately 2.1 million fully searchable transcripts and 155,000 scanned colour images of registers from Shropshire parishes, spanning 1538 to 1900. These are published here online for the first time in association with Shropshire Archives.

There are 1,133,580 baptism records from around 320 parishes in the collection. A baptism record states the date and place an individual was baptised into a church. The information in each record depends on its date, but they typically list an individual’s name, the date and location of their baptism, and are an essential part of researching your family history.

The parents of the person baptised are often named, which can prove a crucial link to the previous generation. Some later records list date of birth, mother’s maiden name and the father’s occupation.

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Australian Imperial Force Embarkation Roll 1914-1918 ›

AIF image 1

The First World War Embarkation Rolls consist of nominal rolls of some 330,000 personnel of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF), and the Army component of the Australian Naval & Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) as they embarked for service oversees during World War 1.

The Rolls list details of members of the Australian Flying Corps (AFC) and the Royal Australian Naval Bridging Train (RANBT).

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Australian Imperial Force Nominal Roll 1914-1918 ›

AIF image 2

The World War 1 nominal roll contains the details of approximately 324,000 AIF personnel, recorded to assist with their repatriation to Australia from overseas service following World War 1.

The roll was compiled before October 1919, most likely at the Australian Imperial Force Administrative Headquarters in London. It includes the names of those who served with the Australian Flying Corps and Australian Medical Corps.
The details recorded include: service number, final rank, name, military unit at time of death or end of service, date of enlistment, non-effective entry (i.e. how that person became no longer effective, for example by returning to Australia), and date of death or start date of non-effect.

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Civil War Soldiers (1861-1865) ›

soldiers cw

The American Civil War was fought between 1861 and 1865, after a number of Southern states seceded from the country and formed the Confederate States of America. The ensuing conflict became the bloodiest war in American history, with millions of Americans recruited on both sides.

The war was brought to a close in April of 1865 following the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, close to the Union-Confederate border on the east coast of the United States. The six million records in this collection represent nearly every documented soldier who fought in either the Union or Confederate army during the U.S. Civil War. They list the details of a soldier’s regiment, rank, and dates of service.

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Civil War Sailors (1861-1865) ›

sailors

The American Civil War changed the foundations of naval warfare forever. Advances in technology meant the conflict saw the first-time use of ironclad ships and submarines, as well as the introduction of newer and more powerful naval artillery.

Naval warfare is not normally acknowledged as a key part of the Civil War as the Confederate Navy only had a few ships and was blockaded by the Union for the entire war. This collection consists of nearly 18,000 records that list a sailor’s name, city of birth, year of birth, age, height, complexion (race), occupation, place of enlistment, date of enlistment, rating, and ship name. It even includes the records of a number of sailors who served on the USS Monitor, the first ironclad warship of the US Navy.

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Civil War Prisoners (1861-1865) ›

Civil War prisoner

Both the Union and the Confederacy built prison camps to handle the 409,000 soldiers captured during the American Civil war. Initially, the Union and Confederate governments both relied on the traditional European system of parole and exchange of prisoners.

A prisoner who was on parole promised not to fight again until his name was “exchanged” for a similar man on the other side. In 1863 this process broke down and the number of POWs soared high enough to seriously damage the confederate economy and war effort. This huge collection of over six million records lists the details of prisoners of war from both sides of the conflict. They contain useful information such as a prisoner’s name, the side they fought for, their military unit, rank and the place and date of their capture.

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Civil War Medal of Honor (1861-1865) ›

Civil war med

The Medal of Honor is the United States of America’s highest military honor, awarded for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty. It was created in 1861, early in the American Civil War, to give recognition to men who distinguished themselves “conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity” in combat.

These records list over a 1,000 Civil War veterans who were awarded the U.S. Medal of Honor. They contain details of the Unit and Company they fought with, the date and place of their citation and details of the citations itself as well as the date the medal was issued.

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Royal Navy Seamen 1899-1919 [ADM 188] ›

Royal-Navy-Seamen resized

The Royal Navy can trace its origins to the 16th century. Often referred to as the Senior Service, it is the oldest service branch of the British Armed Forces. It was the most powerful navy in the world from the end of the 17th century until well into the 20th century, and played a central part in establishing the British Empire as the dominant world power.

The Royal Navy Seaman records contain the complete service histories of up to 375,000 ratings who joined up between 1899 and 1919. Our Royal Navy Officers’ records are held in a separate series which we are also publishing. The period covered takes in both the Boer war (1899-1902) and the World War 1 (1914-1918). It’s likely that anyone who enlisted in the Royal Navy during this period could have seen active service in one or both of these conflicts.

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Royal Marines 1899-1919 [ADM 159] ›

Royal Mrines

The Royal Marines were formed in 1755 as marine infantry for the Royal Navy.

During the World War 1, in addition to their usual stations on board war ships, Royal Marines were part of the Royal Naval Division which landed in Belgium in 1914 to help defend the port of Antwerp. They later took part in the amphibious landings at Gallipoli in 1915, and served on the Western Front.

These records contain the full service records of up to 76,000 men who joined the regiment between 1899 and 1919.

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Royal Navy Officers 1899-1919 [ADM 196] ›

Royal-Navy-Officer resized

A commissioned officer was someone who became an officer by being awarded a royal commission, usually after passing an examination. Commissioned officer ranks include Admiral of the Fleet, Admiral, Vice-Admiral, Rear-Admiral, Commodore, Captain, Commander, Lieutenant-Commander, Lieutenant, and Sub-Lieutenant.

The Royal Navy Officers records contain the complete service histories of up to 79,000 Royal Navy officers who joined the Royal Navy between 1899 and 1919. This period covers two major conflicts: the Boer war and the World War 1. Our Royal Navy ratings records are held in a separate series which we are also publishing.

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Royal Fusiliers, Stockbrokers' Battalion 1914-1918 ›

Photo courtesy Paul Reed - Great War Photos http://greatwarphotos.com

The Stockbrokers’ Battalion, (officially the 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers) is now generally acknowledged as the first Pals-type battalion to have been formed. Major Robert White, encouraged by his friend, General Henry Rawlinson, appealed to City of London firms to raise enough men to form a battalion. Within a week in late August 1914, 1,600 men had responded and the Stockbrokers’ Battalion, (initially known simply as The City Battalion) was born.

The battalion comprised officer-class stockbrokers serving alongside clerks and office boys from well-known institutions including the Stock Exchange and Lloyds, as well as a host of smaller businesses. This collection comprises around 1300 records

Photo courtesy Paul Reed – Great War Photos http://greatwarphotos.com

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23rd Battalion (1st Sportsman's Battalion) Royal Fusiliers 1914-1918 ›

Sportsman or Stockbroker Battalion

The 1st Sportsman’s Battalion, (officially the 23rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers), was formed at the Hotel Cecil on The Strand in September 1914, and included some well-known sporting personalities of the day. Among its number were several county cricketers, golfers, athletes, travellers and adventurers. The 3,100 records contained in this collection have been compiled from the battalion’s nominal roll, honours’ list, and roll of honour which was first published in 1920.  The information typically gives details of name, rank, number (in the case of Other Ranks), awards, and casualties.

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South Down Battalions (11th, 12th & 13th Royal Sussex) ›

Southdown

The 11th, 12th and 13th South Downs Battalions, numbering approximately 4,500 men, were known colloquially as  ”Lowther’s Lambs”, a reference to local MP Claude Lowther who had taken personal responsibility for raising the battalions. The 12th and 13th Battalions were sacrificed in a diversionary raid on 30th June 1916 in an attempt to draw German attention away from the main Somme battle area further south. Over 300 men, including six sets of brothers, were killed that day and over 1,000 wounded. June 30th 1916 was subsequently known as “the day Sussex died”.

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Salford Pals (15th, 16th & 19th & 20th Lancashire Fusiliers) ›

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Salford raised four Pals Battalions in November 1914 and March 1915, numbering about 4,500 men. Salford men were already serving in the town’s two local Territorial Force battalions, and many Salford men had already joined the Manchester Pals. They travelled together to France in November 1915.

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Liverpool Pals 1914 - 1918 ›

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The Liverpool Pals were officially the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th Service Battalions of The King’s Liverpool Regiment. They were formed into the 89th Brigade and fought alongside the Manchester and Oldham Pals in the 30th Division.

These records list nearly 7,000 men who made up the original battalion members in 1914.

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Glasgow Pals 1914 - 1918 ›

First World War Solider

The Glasgow Pals were officially the 15th, 16th and 17th Battalions of the Highland Light Infantry and, as their name indicates, all three battalions were raised in the City of Glasgow . The majority of the men enlisted between September and December 1914.

All three battalions went into action in the Somme Offensive in July 1916, the 16th and 17th Battalions both sustaining heavy casualties on the opening day.

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Edinburgh Pals (15th & 16th Royal Scots Regt)  ›

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The Edinburgh Pals, approximately 2,500 men, were officially the 15th and 16th Service Battalions of the Royal Scots Regiments.

Around 550 men from Manchester enlisted into the 15th Battalion and were known colloquially as “The Manchester Scottish”. Both Pals Battalions attacked on 1st July 1916 and they sustained heavy casualties. The 15th Battalion had 226 men killed whilst the 16th Battalion lost 221.  Barely 100 men from the combined total of 2,000 men answered the roll call later that day.

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1st Bradford Pals (16th West Yorkshire Regt) ›

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The Bradford Pals were the 16th and 18th Battalions of the West Yorkshire Regiment. They arrived on the Somme in early 1916 and took part in the fighting for Serre on 1st July that year. Within an hour of fighting the two battalions, totalling about 2,000 men, sustained 1,770 casualties with no ground gained.

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Birmingham Employers' Roll of Honour 1914-1918 ›

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The Birmingham Employers’ Roll of Honour 1914-1918 is a roll of men employed by Birmingham firms who were serving with the colours.

Many of the Birmingham Pals also appear in this roll. This allows you to discover where your Birmingham Pals ancestor worked before the war. The three battalions formed part of the 95th Brigade in the 32nd Division.

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Birmingham Pals 1914-1918 ›

Birmingham

The Pals Battalions were the brainchild of Lord Derby, encouraging young men to serve with their friends, neighbours, work colleagues or even team mates. Our series of Pals records include information from medal index cards, service records and other contemporary sources to provide the most complete picture of the Pals Battalions to date.

The Birmingham Pals were three battalions raised from men volunteering in the city of Birmingham in September 1914. They became the 14th, 15th and 16th Service Battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment..

These records contain details to company and platoon level and list just under 4,000 men.

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